ULCOMBE’S WAR

BATTLE OF BRITAIN

A Battle of Britain shootdown in a Kent village was documented by a series of mystery photographs. 

“Life in the sleepy Kent village would occasionally be shattered by circumstances that thrust a little excitement upon inhabitants. No truer would this be than during the Battle of Britain”

Today, Ulcombe is a charming village of fewer than 1,000 people. Situated nine miles southeast of Maidstone, its unusual name is derived from the Old English ‘coomb’, meaning a deep but small wooded valley.

Traces of the village’s long history can still be found – the remains of the original medieval settlement are to the east, while archaeological evidence of Roman and Bronze Age occupation have been found nearby. The All Saints Church dates to the 1100s and was built on ground that had already been a site of worship for 1,000 years. Nearby yews, often planted to mark sites of religious importance, predate the church, with one said to be 2,400 years old. 

Yet, life in the sleepy village would occasionally be shattered by circumstances that thrust a little excitement upon its inhabitants. No truer would this be than during the Battle of Britain, as Ulcombe’s location – 50 miles from Dover and 54 from the heart of London – meant the aerial struggle raged directly overhead.

Want to read more?

This is a premium article and requires an active subscription.

Existing subscriber? Sign in now

No subscription?

Pick one of our introductory offers